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Title: Online Delivery of Social Media Posts to Appropriate First Responders for Disaster Response
Delivering the right information to the right people in a timely manner can greatly improve outcomes and save lives in emergency response. A communication framework that flexibly and efficiently brings victims, volunteers, and first responders together for timely assistance can be very helpful. With the burden of more frequent and intense disaster situations and first responder resources stretched thin, people increasingly depend on social media for communicating vital information. This paper proposes ONSIDE, a framework for coordination of disaster response leveraging social media, integrating it with Information-Centric dissemination for timely and relevant dissemination. We use a graph-based pub/sub namespace that captures the complex hierarchy of the incident management roles. Regular citizens and volunteers using social media may not know of or have access to the full namespace. Thus, we utilize a social media engine (SME) to identify disaster-related social media posts and then automatically map them to the right name(s) in near-real-time. Using NLP and classification techniques, we direct the posts to appropriate first responder(s) that can help with the posted issue. A major challenge for classifying social media in real-time is the labeling effort for model training. Furthermore, as disasters hits, there may be not enough data points available for labeling, and there may be concept drift in the content of the posts over time. To address these issues, our SME employs stream-based active learning methods, adapting as social media posts come in. Preliminary evaluation results show the proposed solution can be effective.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1818971
NSF-PAR ID:
10297458
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
In 3rd International Workshop on Emergency Response Technologies and Services in Adjunct Proceedings of the 2021 International Conference on Distributed Computing and Networking (ICDCN ’21)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
13 to 18
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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