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Title: FabHandWear: An End-to-End Pipeline from Design to Fabrication of Customized Functional Hand Wearables
Current hand wearables have limited customizability, they are loose-fit to an individual's hand and lack comfort. The main barrier in customizing hand wearables is the geometric complexity and size variation in hands. Moreover, there are different functions that the users can be looking for; some may only want to detect hand's motion or orientation; others may be interested in tracking their vital signs. Current wearables usually fit multiple functions and are designed for a universal user with none or limited customization. There are no specialized tools that facilitate the creation of customized hand wearables for varying hand sizes and provide different functionalities. We envision an emerging generation of customizable hand wearables that supports hand differences and promotes hand exploration with additional functionality. We introduce FabHandWear, a novel system that allows end-to-end design and fabrication of customized functional self-contained hand wearables. FabHandWear is designed to work with off-the-shelf electronics, with the ability to connect them automatically and generate a printable pattern for fabrication. We validate our system by using illustrative applications, a durability test, and an empirical user evaluation. Overall, FabHandWear offers the freedom to create customized, functional, and manufacturable hand wearables.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1839971
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10297577
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies
Volume:
5
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 22
ISSN:
2474-9567
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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