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Title: NSEC 2016 Conference Proceedings
Abstracts and presentations from the 2016 SMTI/NSEC National Conference held on June 8-9, 2016. The theme was Center Roles in Improving Undergraduate STEM Education. The Keynote Speaker was Shirley Malcom, Head of Education and Human Resources Programs (EHR), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and committee chair of the National Academies' Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees.
Authors:
;
Editors:
Redd, Kacy; Finkelstein, Noah
Award ID(s):
1524832
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10302918
Journal Name:
Network of STEM Education Centers National Conference
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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