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Title: Transformative Learning Networks: Guidelines and Insights for Netweavers
NSEC commissioned researchers to prepare four case studies to identify the opportunities and challenges of a learning network approach, with the purpose of informing NSEC's design. This report outlines the findings from those case studies. The report's primary audience are the designers and members of learning networks in the improving STEM education space.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1524832
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10303651
Journal Name:
Network of STEM Education Centers
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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