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Title: On an inverse potential problem for a fractional reaction–diffusion equation
Abstract

This paper considers an inverse problem for a reaction diffusion equation from overposed final time data. Specifically, we assume that the reaction termis known but modified by a space-dependent coefficientto obtain. Thus the strength of the reaction can vary with location. The inverse problem is to recover this coefficient. Our technique is to use iterative Newton-type methods although we also use and analyse higher order schemes of Halley type. We show that such schemes are well defined and prove convergence results. Our assumption about the diffusion process is also more general in that we will extend the traditional parabolic equation paradigm to include the subdiffusion case based on non-local fractional order operators in time. The final section of the paper shows numerical reconstructions based on the above methods and compares our methodology to previous work based on the linear model withas well as to the nonlinear case. We also show the interdependence between effective reconstruction ofqand the coupling between the value of the final time of measurement and the subdiffusion parameter.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10305128
Journal Name:
Inverse Problems
Volume:
35
Issue:
6
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 065004
ISSN:
0266-5611
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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