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Title: The Mass Distribution of Neutron Stars in Gravitational-wave Binaries
Abstract

The discovery of two neutron star–black hole coalescences by LIGO and Virgo brings the total number of likely neutron stars observed in gravitational waves to six. We perform the first inference of the mass distribution of this extragalactic population of neutron stars. In contrast to the bimodal Galactic population detected primarily as radio pulsars, the masses of neutron stars in gravitational-wave binaries are thus far consistent with a uniform distribution, with a greater prevalence of high-mass neutron stars. The maximum mass in the gravitational-wave population agrees with that inferred from the neutron stars in our Galaxy and with expectations from dense matter.

 
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Award ID(s):
1836734
NSF-PAR ID:
10305261
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Volume:
921
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2041-8205
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: Article No. L25
Size(s):
["Article No. L25"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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