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Title: Relativistic short-pulse high harmonic generation at 1.3 and 2.1 μm wavelengths
Abstract

While nearly all investigations of high order harmonic generation with relativistically intense laser pulses have taken place at 800 or 1053 nm, very few experimental studies have been done at other wavelengths. In this study, we investigate the scaling of relativistic high harmonic generation towards longer wavelengths at intensities ofa0 ∼ 1. Longer driver wavelengths enable enhanced diagnostics of the harmonic emission, as multiple orders lie in the optical regime. We measure the conversion efficiency by collecting the entire harmonic emission as well as the divergence through direct imaging. We compare the emission with 2D particle-in-cell simulations to determine the experimental target conditions. This new regime of high order harmonic generation also enables relativistic scaling as well as improved discrimination of harmonic generation mechanisms.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10307153
Journal Name:
New Journal of Physics
Volume:
21
Issue:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 043052
ISSN:
1367-2630
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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