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Title: Implementation of ACTS into sPHENIX Track Reconstruction
Abstract

sPHENIX is a high energy nuclear physics experiment under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The primary physics goals of sPHENIX are to study the quark-gluon-plasma, as well as the partonic structure of protons and nuclei, by measuring jets, their substructure, and heavy flavor hadrons in$$p$$p$$+$$+$$p$$p,p+ Au, and Au + Au collisions. sPHENIX will collect approximately 300 PB of data over three run periods, to be analyzed using available computing resources at BNL; thus, performing track reconstruction in a timely manner is a challenge due to the high occupancy of heavy ion collision events. The sPHENIX experiment has recently implemented the A Common Tracking Software (ACTS) track reconstruction toolkit with the goal of reconstructing tracks with high efficiency and within a computational budget of 5 s per minimum bias event. This paper reports the performance status of ACTS as the default track fitting tool within sPHENIX, including discussion of the first implementation of a time projection chamber geometry within ACTS.

Authors:
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Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10307900
Journal Name:
Computing and Software for Big Science
Volume:
5
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2510-2036
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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