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Title: Design-based Research in GIS-infused Disciplinary Courses: Toward a Design Framework
Geographic information systems (GIS) is valuable as a teaching and learning tool and will play a key role in the careers of current K-12 students (NRC, 2006). However, little work has been done to understand effective approaches to integrating GIS into content instruction. In this paper, we discuss the adaptation of the Learning for Use model, a framework for the design of technology-supported, content-driven inquiry tasks (Edelson, 2001), for the context of GIS-infused content courses. Using a design-based research approach, we developed a set of design principles that reflect key elements of effective GIS-driven content instruction, which guided the adaptation of the design framework. The goal of this work is to develop a set of supports to scaffold the co-design and implementation of GIS-infused content courses that will inform a general design model of infusing GIS into content courses.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1759371
NSF-PAR ID:
10309092
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Editor(s):
Gresalfi, M.; Horn, I. S.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, 14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2020
Volume:
2
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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