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Title: Making Research Practice Partnerships Work: An Assessment of The Maker Partnership
Strong, equitable research practice partnerships (RPPs) center both researcher and practitioner perspectives and priorities. These RPPs facilitate rigorous, relevant research that practitioners can use to improve program implementation. Our project, The Maker Partnership, is an RPP focused on building knowledge about how to help elementary level teachers integrate computer science (CS) and computational thinking (CT) into their regular science classes using maker pedagogy. In this experience report, we use the Henrich et al. framework to assess the Maker Partnership’s effectiveness along five dimensions and share practical advice and lessons learned. This paper contributes to the CS and RPP literature by providing insight into how an RPP can address critical problems of practice in computer science education.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1742320
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10309859
Journal Name:
Annual Conference on Research in Equity and Sustained Participation in Engineering, Computing, and Technology (RESPECT)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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