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This content will become publicly available on October 28, 2022

Title: Transcriptomic Effects of Acute Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure on Two Syntrichia Mosses
Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a major environmental stressor for terrestrial plants. Here we investigated genetic responses to acute broadband UVR exposure in the highly desiccation-tolerant mosses Syntrichia caninervis and Syntrichia ruralis , using a comparative transcriptomics approach. We explored whether UVR protection is physiologically plastic and induced by UVR exposure, addressing the following questions: (1) What is the timeline of changes in the transcriptome with acute UVR exposure in these two species? (2) What genes are involved in the UVR response? and (3) How do the two species differ in their transcriptomic response to UVR? There were remarkable differences between the two species after 10 and 30 min of UVR exposure, including no overlap in significantly differentially abundant transcripts (DATs) after 10 min of UVR exposure and more than twice as many DATs for S. caninervis as there were for S. ruralis . Photosynthesis-related transcripts were involved in the response of S. ruralis to UVR, while membrane-related transcripts were indicated in the response of S. caninervis . In both species, transcripts involved in oxidative stress and those important for desiccation tolerance (such as late embryogenesis abundant genes and early light-inducible protein genes) were involved in response to UVR, suggesting possible more » roles in UVR tolerance and cross-talk with desiccation tolerance in these species. The results of this study suggest potential UVR-induced responses that may have roles outside of UVR tolerance, and that the response to URV is different in these two species, perhaps a reflection of adaptation to different environmental conditions. « less
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1638956
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10313959
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Plant Science
Volume:
12
ISSN:
1664-462X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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