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Title: Community Capitals Framework for Linking Buildings and Organizations for Enhancing Community Resilience through the Built Environment
Award ID(s):
1847373
NSF-PAR ID:
10314962
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Infrastructure Systems
Volume:
28
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1076-0342
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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