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Title: Incorporation of Proteins into Complex Coacervates
Complex coacervates have found a renewed interest in the past few decades in various fields such as food and personal care products, membraneless cellular compartments, the origin of life, and, most notably, as a mode of transport and stabilization of drugs. Here, we describe general methods for characterizing the phase behavior of complex coacervates and quantifying the incorporation of proteins into these phase separated materials.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1945521
NSF-PAR ID:
10317183
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Editor(s):
Keating, C.D.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Methods in enzymology
Volume:
646
ISSN:
0076-6879
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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