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This content will become publicly available on February 21, 2023

Title: Elucidation of Sequence–Function Relationships for an Improved Biobutanol In Vivo Biosensor in E. coli
Transcription factor (TF)–promoter pairs have been repurposed from native hosts to provide tools to measure intracellular biochemical production titer and dynamically control gene expression. Most often, native TF–promoter systems require rigorous screening to obtain desirable characteristics optimized for biotechnological applications. High-throughput techniques may provide a rational and less labor-intensive strategy to engineer user-defined TF–promoter pairs using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and deep sequencing methods (sort-seq). Based on the designed promoter library’s distribution characteristics, we elucidate sequence–function interactions between the TF and DNA. In this work, we use the sort-seq method to study the sequence–function relationship of a σ 54 -dependent, butanol-responsive TF–promoter pair, BmoR-P BMO derived from Thauera butanivorans , at the nucleotide level to improve biosensor characteristics, specifically an improved dynamic range. Activities of promoters from a mutagenized P BMO library were sorted based on gfp expression and subsequently deep sequenced to correlate site-specific sequences with changes in dynamic range. We identified site-specific mutations that increase the sensor output. Double mutant and a single mutant, CA(129,130)TC and G(205)A, in P BMO promoter increased dynamic ranges of 4-fold and 1.65-fold compared with the native system, respectively. In addition, sort-seq identified essential sites required for the proper function of the σ 54 more » -dependent promoter biosensor in the context of the host. This work can enable high-throughput screening methods for strain development. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1847226
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10319603
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
Volume:
10
ISSN:
2296-4185
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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