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This content will become publicly available on March 1, 2023

Title: SINE-Based Phylogenomics Reveal Extensive Introgression and Incomplete Lineage Sorting in Myotis
Using presence/absence data from over 10,000 Ves SINE insertions, we reconstructed a phylogeny for 11 Myotis species. With nearly one-third of individual Ves gene trees discordant with the overall species tree, phylogenetic conflict appears to be rampant in this genus. From the observed conflict, we infer that ILS is likely a major contributor to the discordance. Much of the discordance can be attributed to the hypothesized split between the Old World and New World Myotis clades and with the first radiation of Myotis within the New World. Quartet asymmetry tests reveal signs of introgression between Old and New World taxa that may have persisted until approximately 8 MYA. Our introgression tests also revealed evidence of both historic and more recent, perhaps even contemporary, gene flow among Myotis species of the New World. Our findings suggest that hybridization likely played an important role in the evolutionary history of Myotis and may still be happening in areas of sympatry. Despite limitations arising from extreme discordance, our SINE-based phylogeny better resolved deeper relationships (particularly the positioning of M. brandtii) and was able to identify potential introgression pathways among the Myotis species sampled.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1838283
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10321667
Journal Name:
Genes
Volume:
13
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2073-4425
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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