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Title: DNA methylation analysis reveals epimutation hotspots in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy-associated laminopathies
Abstract Background Mutations in LMNA , encoding lamin A/C, lead to a variety of diseases known as laminopathies including dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and skeletal abnormalities. Though previous studies have investigated the dysregulation of gene expression in cells from patients with DCM, the role of epigenetic (gene regulatory) mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, has not been thoroughly investigated. Furthermore, the impact of family-specific LMNA mutations on DNA methylation is unknown. Here, we performed reduced representation bisulfite sequencing on ten pairs of fibroblasts and their induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) derivatives from two families with DCM due to distinct LMNA mutations, one of which also induces brachydactyly. Results Family-specific differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were identified by comparing the DNA methylation landscape of patient and control samples. Fibroblast DMRs were found to enrich for distal regulatory features and transcriptionally repressed chromatin and to associate with genes related to phenotypes found in tissues affected by laminopathies. These DMRs, in combination with transcriptome-wide expression data and lamina-associated domain (LAD) organization, revealed the presence of inter-family epimutation hotspots near differentially expressed genes, most of which were located outside LADs redistributed in LMNA -related DCM. Comparison of DMRs found in fibroblasts and iPSCs identified regions where epimutations more » were persistent across both cell types. Finally, a network of aberrantly methylated disease-associated genes revealed a potential molecular link between pathways involved in bone and heart development. Conclusions Our results identified both shared and mutation-specific laminopathy epimutation landscapes that were consistent with lamin A/C mutation-mediated epigenetic aberrancies that arose in somatic and early developmental cell stages. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1763272
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10322259
Journal Name:
Clinical Epigenetics
Volume:
13
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1868-7075
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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