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This content will become publicly available on February 1, 2023

Title: CMB/kSZ and Compton-y Maps from 2500 deg 2 of SPT-SZ and Planck Survey Data
Abstract We present component-separated maps of the primary cosmic microwave background/kinematic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ) amplitude and the thermal SZ Compton- y parameter, created using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Planck satellite. These maps, which cover the ∼2500 deg 2 of the southern sky imaged by the SPT-SZ survey, represent a significant improvement over previous such products available in this region by virtue of their higher angular resolution ( 1 .′ 25 for our highest-resolution Compton- y maps) and lower noise at small angular scales. In this work we detail the construction of these maps using linear combination techniques, including our method for limiting the correlation of our lowest-noise Compton- y map products with the cosmic infrared background. We perform a range of validation tests on these data products to test our sky modeling and combination algorithms, and we find good performance in all of these tests. Recognizing the potential utility of these data products for a wide range of astrophysical and cosmological analyses, including studies of the gas properties of galaxies, groups, and clusters, we make these products publicly available at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/sptsz_ymap and on the NASA/LAMBDA website.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1852617
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10323223
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
Volume:
258
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0067-0049
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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