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This content will become publicly available on May 9, 2023

Title: Development and validation of predictive models for COVID-19 outcomes in a safety-net hospital population
Abstract Objective To develop predictive models of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes, elucidate the influence of socioeconomic factors, and assess algorithmic racial fairness using a racially diverse patient population with high social needs. Materials and Methods Data included 7,102 patients with positive (RT-PCR) severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 test at a safety-net system in Massachusetts. Linear and nonlinear classification methods were applied. A score based on a recurrent neural network and a transformer architecture was developed to capture the dynamic evolution of vital signs. Combined with patient characteristics, clinical variables, and hospital occupancy measures, this dynamic vital score was used to train predictive models. Results Hospitalizations can be predicted with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 92% using symptoms, hospital occupancy, and patient characteristics, including social determinants of health. Parsimonious models to predict intensive care, mechanical ventilation, and mortality that used the most recent labs and vitals exhibited AUCs of 92.7%, 91.2%, and 94%, respectively. Early predictive models, using labs and vital signs closer to admission had AUCs of 81.1%, 84.9%, and 92%, respectively. Discussion The most accurate models exhibit racial bias, being more likely to falsely predict that Black patients will be hospitalized. Models that more » are only based on the dynamic vital score exhibited accuracies close to the best parsimonious models, although the latter also used laboratories. Conclusions This large study demonstrates that COVID-19 severity may accurately be predicted using a score that accounts for the dynamic evolution of vital signs. Further, race, social determinants of health, and hospital occupancy play an important role. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1664644 1914792 1645681
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10330398
Journal Name:
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association
ISSN:
1067-5027
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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