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Title: Investigating the impact of COVID-19 on standardized test scores.
The COVID-19 pandemic has ravaged onward over the last year and has greatly impacted student learning. An average student is predicted to fall behind approximately seven months academically; however, this learning gap predicts Latinx and Black students will fall behind by 9 and 10 months, respectively (Seiden, 2020). Moreover, the shift to online instruction impacted students’ ability to learn as they encountered new stressors, anxiety, illness, and the pandemic’s psychological effects (Middleton, 2020). Despite the unprecedented circumstances that students were precipitously thrust into, state testing and assessments continue. Assessments during the pandemic are likely to produce invalid results due to “test pollution,” which refers to the systemic “increase or decrease in test scores unrelated to the content domain” (Middleton, 2020, p. 2). Considering the global pandemic, test pollution is prominent and worth exploring as it is uncertain whether state testing can identify the impact COVID is having on student learning.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1720646 2100988
NSF-PAR ID:
10333502
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
Olanoff, D; Johnson, K.; Spitzer, S
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Psychology of Mathematics Education North American
Page Range / eLocation ID:
325-326
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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