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Title: Cognitively Assistive Robots at Home: HRI Design Patterns for Translational Science
Much research in healthcare robotics explores ex- tending rehabilitative interventions to the home. However, for adults, little guidance exists on how to translate human-delivered, clinic-based interventions into robot-delivered, home-based ones to support longitudinal interaction. This is particularly problematic for neurorehabilitation, where adults with cognitive impairments require unique styles of interaction to avoid frustration or overstimulation. In this paper, we address this gap by exploring the design of robot-delivered neurorehabilitation interventions for people with mild cognitive impairment (PwMCI). Through a multi-year collaboration with clinical neuropsychologists and PwMCI, we developed robot prototypes which deliver cognitive training at home. We used these prototypes as design probes to understand how participants envision long-term deployment of the intervention, and how it can be contextualized to the lives of PwMCI. We report our findings and specify design patterns and considerations for translating neurorehabilitation interventions to robots. This work will serve as a basis for future endeavors to translate cognitive training and other clinical interventions onto a robot, support longitudinal engagement with home-deployed robots, and ultimately extend the accessibility of longitudinal health interventions for people with cognitive impairments.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1915734
NSF-PAR ID:
10333869
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 17th Annual ACM/IEEE Conference on Human Robot Interaction (HRI)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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