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Title: Corrigendum to New Phytologist 230 (2021), 2261–2274, doi: 10.1111/nph. 17152.
Since its publication, the authors of Wang et al. (2021) have brought to our attention an error in their article. A grant awarded by the National Science Foundation (grant no. MCB 1817985) to author Elizabeth Vierling was omitted from the Acknowledgements section. The correct Acknowledgements section is shown below. Acknowledgements We thank Suiwen Hou (Lanzhou University) and Zhaojun Ding (Shandong University) for providing the seeds used in this study. We thank Xiaoping Gou (Lanzhou University) and Ravishankar Palanivelu (University of Arizona) for critically reading the manuscript and for suggestions regarding the article. This work was supported by grants from National Natural Science Foundation of China (31870298) to SX, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA-CSREES-NRI-001030) and the National Science Foundation (MCB 1817985) to EV, and the Youth 1000-Talent Program of China (A279021801) to LY.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1817985
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10338600
Journal Name:
New phytologist
Volume:
232
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
958-958
ISSN:
0028-646X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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