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Title: Why Do Students Enroll in AP CSP?
CS4All initiatives nationwide have been working to increase and diversify student participation in computer science (CS). One intentional effort to broaden participation in CS was the launch of the Advanced Placement (AP) CS Principles (CSP) course, which sought to increase the number of students enrolling in CS overall as well as from groups historically underrepresented in CS. Early AP CSP implementation results are encouraging and have identified the need to better understand essential supports for quality implementation, differential student experiences and outcomes, and students’ motivations for course enrollment. In this paper, we explore the motivations that affect student decisions to take AP CSP using survey data collected during fall 2019 in the New York City public schools, the largest school district in the U.S. This work is part of an ongoing research-practice partnership that provides teacher and school supports for AP CSP implementation and aims to improve outcomes especially for female, Black, and Latinx students in high-need schools. In particular, we examine how students’ reasons and influences for enrolling in AP CSP may differ based on self-identified gender and race/ethnicity. Our findings indicate that while most students shared an interest in learning more about CS, students from communities historically underrepresented in computing are more likely to report being placed in the course and to be influenced by guidance counselors. The implications of these results highlight the importance of understanding why students choose AP CSP in developing recruitment resources, student engagement strategies, and supports for implementation.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1837280 1441075
NSF-PAR ID:
10340903
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
RESPECT 2021 Conference Proceedings
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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