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Title: The associations of social and motivational factors to science and mathematics teacher retention.
Teacher turnover in science and mathematics is a significant and consistent challenge for K-12 education in the U.S. This paper provides: (a) an investigation of the relationship between teacher retention and several social and motivational factors; and (b) a comparison of Master Teaching Fellows (MTF) and non-MTF teachers in terms of their retention and social and motivational factors. Teachers are classified into three retention categories: (a) stayers, (b) shifters, and (c) leavers. Social and motivational factors included teaching self-efficacy, diversity dispositions, leadership skills, principal autonomy support, teacher-school fit (adapted from person-organization fit literature), and social networks related to teaching and education. Study 1 included about 250 science and math teachers from the gulf coast region of Texas. Study 2 included 167 science and math teachers across the country. Teachers completed a survey in the summer and fall of 2021. For study 1, multinomial logistics regression analyses indicate: (a) leavers have significantly higher levels of self-efficacy; and (b) shifters have significantly higher levels of leadership skills and lower levels of teacher-school fit. The second study findings indicate: (a) MTFs’ teacher leadership network and teaching self-efficacy are significantly greater than that of non-MTFs’; and (b) MTFs significantly tend to shift to a more » leadership position than non-MTFs do. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
Langran, E.
Award ID(s):
1950019
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10346320
Journal Name:
Proceedings of 2022 Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference
Volume:
2022
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
914-920
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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