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Title: Toward Predicting Human Performance Outcomes From Wearable Technologies: A Computational Modeling Approach
Wearable technologies for measuring digital and chemical physiology are pervading the consumer market and hold potential to reliably classify states of relevance to human performance including stress, sleep deprivation, and physical exertion. The ability to efficiently and accurately classify physiological states based on wearable devices is improving. However, the inherent variability of human behavior within and across individuals makes it challenging to predict how identified states influence human performance outcomes of relevance to military operations and other high-stakes domains. We describe a computational modeling approach to address this challenge, seeking to translate user states obtained from a variety of sources including wearable devices into relevant and actionable insights across the cognitive and physical domains. Three status predictors were considered: stress level, sleep status, and extent of physical exertion; these independent variables were used to predict three human performance outcomes: reaction time, executive function, and perceptuo-motor control. The approach provides a complete, conditional probabilistic model of the performance variables given the status predictors. Construction of the model leverages diverse raw data sources to estimate marginal probability density functions for each of six independent and dependent variables of interest using parametric modeling and maximum likelihood estimation. The joint distributions among variables were more » optimized using an adaptive LASSO approach based on the strength and directionality of conditional relationships (effect sizes) derived from meta-analyses of extant research. The model optimization process converged on solutions that maintain the integrity of the original marginal distributions and the directionality and robustness of conditional relationships. The modeling framework described provides a flexible and extensible solution for human performance prediction, affording efficient expansion with additional independent and dependent variables of interest, ingestion of new raw data, and extension to two- and three-way interactions among independent variables. Continuing work includes model expansion to multiple independent and dependent variables, real-time model stimulation by wearable devices, individualized and small-group prediction, and laboratory and field validation. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1934553
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10351706
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Physiology
Volume:
12
ISSN:
1664-042X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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