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Title: Engineering Students Conceptions of The Hidden Curriculum in Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Learning to Inform Practice
Hidden Curriculum (HC) consists of the unacknowledged and often, unintentional exclusionary systemic messages that are structurally supported and sustained [1]. Due to the persistent influence of HC in helping establish the norm in educational and working environments, research in this topic is gaining prominence in fields like engineering. This paper contributes to the knowledge base by exploring the level of HC awareness (HCA) and the definitions that over 600 undergraduate engineering students across Hispanic-Serving and non-Hispanic Serving Institutions ascribed to when defining HC. Using mixed-methods analysis, two-factor ANOVA was conducted on the quantitative items of HCA, at the intersection of self-identified gender and institutional type. The first round of coding was followed by open and axial coding of the written definitions provided by the participants. Results suggest there were significant differences in levels of HCA between HSIs and non-HSIs with other institutions (e.g, HEIs) having the highest levels of HCA. The responses to the open-ended question yielded four specific themes: (a) Confirmation of Existence of HC; (b) Attribution of HC to Cognitive Elements; (c) Attribution of HC to Socio-Humanistic Elements; and (d) Refusal of Existence of HC. A discussion of its implications was included in this paper.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
2123016
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10357065
Journal Name:
American Society of Engineering Education
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Hidden Curriculum (HC) consists of the unacknowledged and often, unintentional exclusionary systemic messages that are structurally supported and sustained [1]. Due to the persistent influence of HC in helping establish the norm in educational and working environments, research in this topic is gaining prominence in fields like engineering. This paper contributes to the knowledge base by exploring the level of HC awareness (HCA) and the definitions that over 600 undergraduate engineering students across Hispanic-Serving and non-Hispanic Serving Institutions ascribed to when defining HC. Using mixed-methods analysis, two-factor ANOVA was conducted on the quantitative items of HCA, at the intersection of self-identified gender and institutional type. The first round of coding was followed by open and axial coding of the written definitions provided by the participants. Results suggest there were significant differences in levels of HCA between HSIs and non-HSIs with other institutions (e.g, HEIs) having the highest levels of HCA. The responses to the open-ended question yielded four specific themes: (a) Confirmation of Existence of HC; (b) Attribution of HC to Cognitive Elements; (c) Attribution of HC to Socio-Humanistic Elements; and (d) Refusal of Existence of HC. A discussion of its implications was included in this paper.
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