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Title: Major processes of the dissolved cobalt cycle in the North and equatorial Pacific Ocean
Abstract. Over the past decade, the GEOTRACES and wider trace metalgeochemical community has made substantial contributions towardsconstraining the marine cobalt (Co) cycle and its major biogeochemicalprocesses. However, few Co speciation studies have been conducted in theNorth and equatorial Pacific Ocean, a vast portion of the world's oceans byvolume and an important end-member of deep thermohaline circulation.Dissolved Co (dCo) samples, including total dissolved and labile Co, weremeasured at-sea during the GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (GP15) expedition along the 152∘ W longitudinal from 56∘ N to20∘ S. Along this transect, upper-ocean dCo (σ0<26) was linearly correlated with dissolved phosphate (slope = 82±3, µmol : mol) due to phytoplankton uptake and remineralization.As depth increased, dCo concentrations became increasingly decoupled fromphosphate concentrations due to co-scavenging with manganese oxide particlesin the mesopelagic. The transect revealed an organically bound coastalsource of dCo to the Alaskan Stream associated with low-salinity waters. Anintermediate-depth hydrothermal flux of dCo was observed off the Hawaiiancoast at the Loihi Seamount, and the elevated dCo was correlated withpotential xs3He at and above the vent site; however, the Loihi Seamountlikely did not represent a major source of Co to the Pacific basin. Elevatedconcentrations of dCo within oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the equatorialNorth and South Pacific were consistent with the suppression more » of oxidativescavenging, and we estimate that future deoxygenation could increase the OMZdCo inventory by 18 % to 36 % over the next century. In Pacific Deep Water(PDW), a fraction of elevated ligand-bound dCo appeared protected fromscavenging by the high biogenic particle flux in the North Pacific basin.This finding is counter to previous expectations of low dCo concentrationsin the deep Pacific due to scavenging over thermohaline circulation.Compared to a Co global biogeochemical model, the observed transectdisplayed more extreme inventories and fluxes of dCo than predicted by themodel, suggesting a highly dynamic Pacific Co cycle. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1736601 2048774
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10359231
Journal Name:
Biogeosciences
Volume:
19
Issue:
9
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2365 to 2395
ISSN:
1726-4189
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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