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Title: High-pressure compacted recycled polymeric composite waste materials for marine applications
Abstract Abstract

Options for recycling fiber composite polymer (FCP) materials are scarce, as these materials cannot be normally recycled and are toxic when improperly disposed. Additionally, reducing water usage is an increasing concern, as the concrete industry currently uses 10% of the world’s industrial water. Therefore, building upon our previous work, this research explores the use of polymer hybrid carbon and glass composite waste products as reinforcements in high-pressure compacted cement. Our material used nearly 70% less water during manufacturing and exhibited improved durability and salt corrosion resistance. Compression strength tests were performed on high-pressure compacted materials containing 6.0 wt% recycled admixtures before and after saltwater aging, and the results showed that the material retained 90% of its original compression strength after aging, as it contained fewer pores and cavities. Our experimental work was supplemented by molecular dynamics. Simulations, which indicated that the synergetic effects of compaction and FCP admixture addition slowed the diffusion of corrosive salt ions by an average of 84%. Thus, our high-pressure compacted cement material may be suitable for extended use in marine environments, while also reducing the amount of commercial fiber composite polymer waste material that is sent to the landfill.

<bold>Article Highlights</bold>

Fiber composite waste more » was successfully recycled into denser, high-pressure compacted ordinary Portland cement materials.

High-pressure compacted cement samples containing 6% recycled admixtures retained 90% of their compression strength after salt aging.

The high-pressure compaction method utilized 70% less water during specimen fabrication.

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Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10361345
Journal Name:
SN Applied Sciences
Volume:
4
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2523-3963
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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