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Title: viralFlye: assembling viruses and identifying their hosts from long-read metagenomics data
Abstract

Although the use of long-read sequencing improves the contiguity of assembled viral genomes compared to short-read methods, assembling complex viral communities remains an open problem. We describe the viralFlye tool for identification and analysis of metagenome-assembled viruses in long-read assemblies. We show it significantly improves viral assemblies and demonstrate that long-reads result in a much larger array of predicted virus-host associations as compared to short-read assemblies. We demonstrate that the identification of novel CRISPR arrays in bacterial genomes from a newly assembled metagenomic sample provides information for predicting novel hosts for novel viruses.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10363101
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Springer Science + Business Media
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Genome Biology
Volume:
23
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1474-760X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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