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Title: Dynamical Mass of the Exoplanet Host Star HR 8799
Abstract

HR 8799 is a young A5/F0 star hosting four directly imaged giant planets at wide separations (∼16–78 au), which are undergoing orbital motion and have been continuously monitored with adaptive optics imaging since their discovery over a decade ago. We present a dynamical mass of HR 8799 using 130 epochs of relative astrometry of its planets, which include both published measurements and new medium-band 3.1μm observations that we acquired with NIRC2 at Keck Observatory. For the purpose of measuring the host-star mass, each orbiting planet is treated as a massless particle and is fit with a Keplerian orbit using Markov chain Monte Carlo. We then use a Bayesian framework to combine each independent total mass measurement into a cumulative dynamical mass using all four planets. The dynamical mass of HR 8799 is1.470.17+0.12Massuming a uniform stellar mass prior, or1.460.15+0.11Mwith a weakly informative prior based on spectroscopy. There is a strong covariance between the planets’ eccentricities and the total system mass; when the constraint is limited to low-eccentricity solutions ofe< 0.1, which are motivated by dynamical stability, our mass measurement improves to1.430.07+0.06M. Our dynamical mass and other fundamental measured parameters of HR more » 8799 together with Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics Isochrones and Stellar Tracks grids yields a bulk metallicity most consistent with [Fe/H] ∼ −0.25–0.00 dex and an age of 10–23 Myr for the system. This implies hot-start masses of 2.7–4.9MJupfor HR 8799 b and 4.1–7.0MJupfor HR 8799 c, d, and e, assuming they formed at the same time as the host star.

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Authors:
;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10363242
Journal Name:
The Astronomical Journal
Volume:
163
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 52
ISSN:
0004-6256
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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