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Title: On the Fast Radio Burst and Persistent Radio Source Populations
Abstract

The first fast radio burst (FRB) to be precisely localized was associated with a luminous persistent radio source (PRS). Recently, a second FRB/PRS association was discovered for another repeating source of FRBs. However, it is not clear what makes FRBs or PRS or how they are related. We compile FRB and PRS properties to consider the population of FRB/PRS sources. We suggest a practical definition for PRS as FRB associations with luminosity greater than 1029erg s−1Hz−1that are not attributed to star formation activity in the host galaxy. We model the probability distribution of the fraction of FRBs with PRS for repeaters and nonrepeaters, showing there is not yet evidence for repeaters to be preferentially associated with PRS. We discuss how FRB/PRS sources may be distinguished by the combination of active repetition and an excess dispersion measure local to the FRB environment. We use CHIME/FRB event statistics to bound the mean per-source repetition rate of FRBs to be between 25 and 440 yr−1. We use this to provide a bound on the density of FRB-emitting sources in the local universe of between 2.2 × 102and 5.2 × 104Gpc−3assuming a pulsar-like beamwidth for FRB emission. This density implies that PRS may more » comprise as much as 1% of compact, luminous radio sources detected in the local universe. The cosmic density and phenomenology of PRS are similar to that of the newly discovered, off-nuclear “wandering” active galactic nuclei (AGN). We argue that it is likely that some PRS have already been detected and misidentified as AGN.

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Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10363376
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
927
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 55
ISSN:
0004-637X
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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