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Title: Probing Relaxation Dynamics and Stepped Domain Switching in Boron‐Alloyed VO 2
Abstract

The characteristic metal–insulator phase transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide results in nonlinear electrical transport behavior, allowing VO2devices to imitate the complex functions of neurological behavior. Chemical doping is an established method for varying the properties of the MIT, and interstitial dopant boron has been shown to generate a unique dynamic relaxation effect in individual B‐VO2particles. This paper describes the first demonstration of an electrically stimulated B‐VO2proto‐device which manifests a time‐dependent critical transformation temperature and switching voltage derived from the coupling of dopant diffusion dynamics and the metal–insulator transition of VO2. During quasi‐steady current‐driven transitions, the electrical responses of B‐VO2proto‐devices show a step‐by‐step progression through the phase transformation, evidencing domain transformations within individual particles. The dynamic relaxation effect is shown to increase the critical switching voltage by up to 41% (ΔVcrit =0.13 V) and also to increase the resistivity of the M1 phase of B‐VO2by 14%, imbuing a memristive response derived from intrinsic material properties. These observations demonstrate the dynamic relaxation effect in B‐VO2proto‐devices whose electrical transport responses can be adjusted by electronic phase transitions triggered by temperature but also by time as a result of intrinsic dynamics of interstitial dopants.

 
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Award ID(s):
1809866
NSF-PAR ID:
10363724
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Advanced Electronic Materials
Volume:
8
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2199-160X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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