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Title: The Majorana Demonstrator readout electronics system
Abstract The Majorana Demonstrator comprises two arrays of high-purity germanium detectors constructed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76 Ge and other physics beyond the Standard Model. Its readout electronics were designed to have low electronic noise, and radioactive backgrounds were minimized by using low-mass components and low-radioactivity materials near the detectors. This paper provides a description of all components of the Majorana Demonstrator readout electronics, spanning the front-end electronics and internal cabling, back-end electronics, digitizer, and power supplies, along with the grounding scheme. The spectroscopic performance achieved with these readout electronics is also demonstrated.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1812356
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10367958
Journal Name:
Journal of Instrumentation
Volume:
17
Issue:
05
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
T05003
ISSN:
1748-0221
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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