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Title: A Comparative Study of Machine-learning Methods for X-Ray Binary Classification
Abstract

X-ray binaries (XRBs) consist of a compact object that accretes material from an orbiting secondary star. The most secure method we have for determining if the compact object is a black hole is to determine its mass: This is limited to bright objects and requires substantial time-intensive spectroscopic monitoring. With new X-ray sources being discovered with different X-ray observatories, developing efficient, robust means to classify compact objects becomes increasingly important. We compare three machine-learning classification methods (Bayesian Gaussian Processes (BGPs), K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN), Support Vector Machines) for determining whether the compact objects are neutron stars or black holes (BHs) in XRB systems. Each machine-learning method uses spatial patterns that exist between systems of the same type in 3D color–color–intensity diagrams. We used lightcurves extracted using 6 yr of data with MAXI/GSC for 44 representative sources. We find that all three methods are highly accurate in distinguishing pulsing from nonpulsing neutron stars (NPNS) with 95% of NPNS and 100% of pulsars accurately predicted. All three methods have high accuracy in distinguishing BHs from pulsars (92%) but continue to confuse BHs with a subclass of NPNS, called bursters, with KNN doing the best at only 50% accuracy for predicting BHs. The more » precision of all three methods is high, providing equivalent results over 5–10 independent runs. In future work, we will suggest a fourth dimension be incorporated to mitigate the confusion of BHs with bursters. This work paves the way toward more robust methods to efficiently distinguish BHs, NPNS, and pulsars.

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Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10368677
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
933
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 116
ISSN:
0004-637X
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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