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Title: Galactic Winds and Bubbles from Nuclear Starburst Rings
Abstract

Galactic outflows from local starburst galaxies typically exhibit a layered geometry, with cool 104K flow sheathing a hotter 107K, cylindrically collimated, X-ray-emitting plasma. Here we argue that winds driven by energy injection in a ring-like geometry can produce this distinctive large-scale multiphase morphology. The ring configuration is motivated by the observation that massive young star clusters are often distributed in a ring at the host galaxy’s inner Lindblad resonance, where larger-scale spiral arm structure terminates. We present parameterized three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical simulations that follow the emergence and dynamics of energy-driven hot winds from starburst rings. In this letter, we show that the flow shocks on itself within the inner ring hole, maintaining high 107K temperatures, while flows that emerge from the wind-driving ring unobstructed can undergo rapid bulk cooling down to 104K, producing a fast hot biconical outflow enclosed by a sheath of cooler nearly comoving material without ram pressure acceleration. The hot flow is collimated along the ring axis, even in the absence of pressure confinement from a galactic disk or magnetic fields. In the early stages of expansion, the emerging wind forms a bubble-like shape reminiscent of the Milky Way’s eROSITA and Fermi bubbles and can reach velocities usually associated with active-galactic-nucleus-driven winds. We discuss the physics of the ring configuration, the conditions for radiative bulk cooling, and the implications for future X-ray observations.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10369713
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Volume:
935
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2041-8205
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: Article No. L24
Size(s):
["Article No. L24"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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