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Title: Solution of ill-posed problems with Chebfun
Abstract

The analysis of linear ill-posed problems often is carried out in function spaces using tools from functional analysis. However, the numerical solution of these problems typically is computed by first discretizing the problem and then applying tools from finite-dimensional linear algebra. The present paper explores the feasibility of applying the Chebfun package to solve ill-posed problems with a regularize-first approach numerically. This allows a user to work with functions instead of vectors and with integral operators instead of matrices. The solution process therefore is much closer to the analysis of ill-posed problems than standard linear algebra-based solution methods. Furthermore, the difficult process of explicitly choosing a suitable discretization is not required.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10371471
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Springer Science + Business Media
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Numerical Algorithms
Volume:
92
Issue:
4
ISSN:
1017-1398
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 2341-2364
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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