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Title: Locating the Precise Sources of High‐Frequency Microseisms Using Distributed Acoustic Sensing
Abstract

Although microseisms have been observed for more than 100 years, the precise locations of their excitation sources in the oceans are still elusive. Underwater Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) brings new opportunities to study microseism generation mechanisms. Using DAS data off the coast of Valencia, Spain, and applying a cross‐correlation approach, we show that the sources of high‐frequency microseisms (0.5–2 Hz) are confined between 7 and 27 km from the shore, where the water depth varies from 25 to 100 m. Over time, we observe that these sources move quickly along narrow areas, sometimes within a few kilometers. Our methodology applied to DAS data allows us to characterize microseisms with a high spatiotemporal resolution, providing a new way of understanding these global and complex seismic phenomena happening in the oceans.

Authors:
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10372465
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Volume:
49
Issue:
17
ISSN:
0094-8276
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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