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Title: A Foreshock Bubble Driven by an IMF Tangential Discontinuity: 3D Global Hybrid Simulation
Abstract

Foreshock bubbles (FBs) have been observed upstream of solar wind tangential discontinuities (TDs). A hypothesized mechanism is that foreshock ions with gyroradii larger than the TD thickness may move to upstream side of TDs and generate FBs. In this study, we present the very first three‐dimensional global hybrid simulation of an FB driven by a TD. After the TD encounters the ion foreshock, plasma and magnetic field perturbations are generated upstream of the TD. These perturbations are characteristically consistent with the observed TD‐driven FBs, confirming that TDs can form FBs. We further analyze the initial perpendicular temperature increase initiating the FB and compare the temperature structure with that from tracing test‐particles in static TD electric and magnetic fields. The structure can be explained by the perpendicular velocity change of foreshock ions with large gyroradii as they encounter the magnetic field direction change across the TD, which supports the hypothesized mechanism.

 
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Award ID(s):
1941012
NSF-PAR ID:
10375735
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Volume:
48
Issue:
9
ISSN:
0094-8276
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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