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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2023

Title: FunAndes – A functional trait database of Andean plants
Abstract We introduce the FunAndes database, a compilation of functional trait data for the Andean flora spanning six countries. FunAndes contains data on 24 traits across 2,694 taxa, for a total of 105,466 entries. The database features plant-morphological attributes including growth form, and leaf, stem, and wood traits measured at the species or individual level, together with geographic metadata (i.e., coordinates and elevation). FunAndes follows the field names, trait descriptions and units of measurement of the TRY database. It is currently available in open access in the FIGSHARE data repository, and will be part of TRY’s next release. Open access trait data from Andean plants will contribute to ecological research in the region, the most species rich terrestrial biodiversity hotspot.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1836353
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10377913
Journal Name:
Scientific Data
Volume:
9
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2052-4463
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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