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Title: A New Type of Interactive Video for Physics Education
Video analysis tools such as Tracker are used to study mechanical motion captured by photography. One can also imagine a similar tool for tracking thermal motion captured by thermography. Since its introduction to physics education, thermal imaging has been used to visualize phenomena that are invisible to the naked eye and teach a variety of physics concepts across different educational settings. But thermal cameras are still scarce in schools. Hence, videos recorded using thermal cameras such as those featured in “YouTube Physics” are suggested as alternatives. The downside is that students do not have interaction opportunities beyond playing those videos.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2054079
NSF-PAR ID:
10377987
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Physics Teacher
Volume:
60
Issue:
8
ISSN:
0031-921X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
656 to 659
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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