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Title: Cross-seeding between Aβ and SEVI indicates a pathogenic link and gender difference between alzheimer diseases and AIDS
Abstract

Amyloid-β (Aβ) and semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) are considered as the two causative proteins for central pathogenic cause of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and HIV/AIDS, respectively. Separately, Aβ-AD and SEVI-HIV/AIDS systems have been studied extensively both in fundamental research and in clinical trials. Despite significant differences between Aβ-AD and SEVI-HIV/AIDS systems, they share some commonalities on amyloid and antimicrobial characteristics between Aβ and SEVI, there are apparent overlaps in dysfunctional neurological symptoms between AD and HIV/AIDS. Few studies have reported a potential pathological link between Aβ-AD and SEVI-HIV/AIDS at a protein level. Here, we demonstrate the cross-seeding interactions between Aβ and SEVI proteins using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Cross-seeding of SEVI with Aβ enabled to completely prevent Aβ aggregation at sub-stoichiometric concentrations, disaggregate preformed Aβ fibrils, reduce Aβ-induced cell toxicity, and attenuate Aβ-accumulated paralysis in transgenic AD C. elegans. This work describes a potential crosstalk between AD and HIV/AIDS via the cross-seeding between Aβ and SEVI, identifies SEVI as Aβ inhibitor for possible treatment or prevention of AD, and explains the role of SEVI in the gender difference in AD.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10381862
Journal Name:
Communications Biology
Volume:
5
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2399-3642
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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