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This content will become publicly available on November 18, 2023

Title: Wnt signaling directs human pluripotent stem cells into vascularized cardiac organoids with chamber-like structures
Heart diseases are leading cause of death around the world. Given their unique capacity to self-renew and differentiate into all types of somatic cells, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for heart disease modeling and cardiotoxic drug screening. hPSC-derived cardiac organoids are emerging biomimetic models for studying heart development and cardiovascular diseases, but it remains challenging to make mature organoids with a native-like structure in vitro . In this study, temporal modulation of Wnt signaling pathway co-differentiated hPSCs into beating cardiomyocytes and cardiac endothelial-like cells in 3D organoids, resulting in cardiac endothelial-bounded chamber formation. These chambered cardiac organoids exhibited more mature membrane potential compared to cardiac organoids composed of only cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, a better response to toxic drugs was observed in chamber-contained cardiac organoids. In summary, spatiotemporal signaling pathway modulation may lead to more mature cardiac organoids for studying cardiovascular development and diseases.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2143064
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10381941
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
Volume:
10
ISSN:
2296-4185
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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