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Title: The SAMBA tool uses long reads to improve the contiguity of genome assemblies
Third-generation sequencing technologies can generate very long reads with relatively high error rates. The lengths of the reads, which sometimes exceed one million bases, make them invaluable for resolving complex repeats that cannot be assembled using shorter reads. Many high-quality genome assemblies have already been produced, curated, and annotated using the previous generation of sequencing data, and full re-assembly of these genomes with long reads is not always practical or cost-effective. One strategy to upgrade existing assemblies is to generate additional coverage using long-read data, and add that to the previously assembled contigs. SAMBA is a tool that is designed to scaffold and gap-fill existing genome assemblies with additional long-read data, resulting in substantially greater contiguity. SAMBA is the only tool of its kind that also computes and fills in the sequence for all spanned gaps in the scaffolds, yielding much longer contigs. Here we compare SAMBA to several similar tools capable of re-scaffolding assemblies using long-read data, and we show that SAMBA yields better contiguity and introduces fewer errors than competing methods. SAMBA is open-source software that is distributed at https://github.com/alekseyzimin/masurca .  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1744309
NSF-PAR ID:
10383181
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Editor(s):
Shao, Mingfu
Date Published:
Journal Name:
PLOS Computational Biology
Volume:
18
Issue:
2
ISSN:
1553-7358
Page Range / eLocation ID:
e1009860
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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