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Title: Visual Prompt Tuning
The current modus operandi in adapting pre-trained models involves updating all the backbone parameters, ie, full fine-tuning. This paper introduces Visual Prompt Tuning (VPT) as an efficient and effective alternative to full fine-tuning for large-scale Transformer models in vision. Taking inspiration from recent advances in efficiently tuning large language models, VPT introduces only a small amount (less than 1% of model parameters) of trainable parameters in the input space while keeping the model backbone frozen. Via extensive experiments on a wide variety of downstream recognition tasks, we show that VPT achieves significant performance gains compared to other parameter efficient tuning protocols. Most importantly, VPT even outperforms full fine-tuning in many cases across model capacities and training data scales, while reducing per-task storage cost.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2144117
NSF-PAR ID:
10383295
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
European Conference on Computer Vision
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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