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Title: Validating bond-based peridynamic model using displacement potential approach

Although peridynamics is widely used to investigate mechanical responses in materials, the ability of peridynamics to capture the main features of realistic stress states remains unknown. Here, we present a procedure that combines analytic investigation and numerical simulation to capture the elastic field in the mixed boundary condition. By using the displacement potential function, the mixed boundary condition elasticity problem is reduced to a single partial differential equation which can be analytically solved through Fourier analysis. To validate the peridynamic model, we conduct a numerical uniaxial tensile test using peridynamics, which is further compared with the analytic solution through a convergence study. We find that, when the parameters are carefully calibrated, the numerical predicted stress distribution agrees very well with the one obtained from the theoretical calculation.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10386261
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
SAGE Publications
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part C: Journal of Mechanical Engineering Science
Volume:
237
Issue:
12
ISSN:
0954-4062
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 2877-2886
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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