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Title: The Proximity of Disaster Experiences and Financial Preparedness for Emergencies in the US
Abstract Objective: This study investigated how the proximity of disaster experience was associated with financial preparedness for emergencies. Methods: The data used were from the 2018 National Household Survey, which was administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The working sample included 4779 respondents. Results: Logistic Regression showed that the likelihood of setting aside emergency funds tended to be the highest between 2-5 years after experiencing a disaster, which declined slightly but persisted even after 16 years. Recent disaster experience within 1 year did not show a significant impact, indicating a period of substantial needs. However, the proximity of disaster experience did not significantly affect the amount of money set aside. Conclusion: It is suspected that increased risk perception related to previous experiences of disasters is more relevant to the likelihood of preparing financially; whereas other capacity-related factors such as income and having a disability have more effect on the amount of money set aside.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1839516
NSF-PAR ID:
10386279
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
ISSN:
1935-7893
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 4
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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