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Title: Triply-resonant sum frequency conversion with gallium phosphide ring resonators

We demonstrate quasi-phase matched, triply-resonant sum frequency conversion in 10.6-µm-diameter integrated gallium phosphide ring resonators. A small-signal, waveguide-to-waveguide power conversion efficiency of 8 ± 1.1%/mW; is measured for conversion from telecom (1536 nm) and near infrared (1117 nm) to visible (647 nm) wavelengths with an absolute power conversion efficiency of 6.3 ± 0.6%; measured at saturation pump power. For the complementary difference frequency generation process, a single photon conversion efficiency of 7.2%/mW from visible to telecom is projected for resonators with optimized coupling. Efficient conversion from visible to telecom will facilitate long-distance transmission of spin-entangled photons from solid-state emitters such as the diamond NV center, allowing long-distance entanglement for quantum networks.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10389935
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Optical Society of America
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Optics Express
Volume:
31
Issue:
2
ISSN:
1094-4087; OPEXFF
Page Range / eLocation ID:
Article No. 1516
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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