skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 5:00 PM ET until 11:00 PM ET on Friday, June 21 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Title: Neural Human Performer: Learning Generalizable Radiance Fields for Human Performance Rendering
In this paper, we aim at synthesizing a free-viewpoint video of an arbitrary human performance using sparse multi-view cameras. Recently, several works have addressed this problem by learning person-specific neural radiance fields (NeRF) to capture the appearance of a particular human. In parallel, some work proposed to use pixel-aligned features to generalize radiance fields to arbitrary new scenes and objects. Adopting such generalization approaches to humans, however, is highly challenging due to the heavy occlusions and dynamic articulations of body parts. To tackle this, we propose Neural Human Performer, a novel approach that learns generalizable neural radiance fields based on a parametric human body model for robust performance capture. Specifically, we first introduce a temporal transformer that aggregates tracked visual features based on the skeletal body motion over time. Moreover, a multi-view transformer is proposed to perform cross-attention between the temporally-fused features and the pixel-aligned features at each time step to integrate observations on the fly from multiple views. Experiments on the ZJU-MoCap and AIST datasets show that our method significantly outperforms recent generalizable NeRF methods on unseen identities and poses. The video results and code are available at https://youngjoongunc.github.io/nhp.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1840131
NSF-PAR ID:
10390738
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
35th Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS 2021)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Neural Radiance Fields (NeRF) have become an increasingly popular representation to capture high-quality appearance and shape of scenes and objects. However, learning generalizable NeRF priors over categories of scenes or objects has been challenging due to the high dimensionality of network weight space. To address the limitations of existing work on generalization, multi-view consistency and to improve quality, we propose HyP-NeRF, a latent conditioning method for learning generalizable category-level NeRF priors using hypernetworks. Rather than using hypernetworks to estimate only the weights of a NeRF, we estimate both the weights and the multi-resolution hash encodings resulting in significant quality gains. To improve quality even further, we incorporate a denoise and finetune strategy that denoises images rendered from NeRFs estimated by the hypernetwork and finetunes it while retaining multiview consistency. These improvements enable us to use HyP-NeRF as a generalizable prior for multiple downstream tasks including NeRF reconstruction from single-view or cluttered scenes and text-to-NeRF. We provide qualitative comparisons and evaluate HyP-NeRF on three tasks: generalization, compression, and retrieval, demonstrating our state-of-the-art results. 
    more » « less
  2. Neural Radiance Fields (NeRF) have become an increasingly popular representation to capture high-quality appearance and shape of scenes and objects. However, learning generalizable NeRF priors over categories of scenes or objects has been challenging due to the high dimensionality of network weight space. To address the limitations of existing work on generalization, multi-view consistency and to improve quality, we propose HyP-NeRF, a latent conditioning method for learning generalizable category-level NeRF priors using hypernetworks. Rather than using hypernetworks to estimate only the weights of a NeRF, we estimate both the weights and the multi-resolution hash encodings resulting in significant quality gains. To improve quality even further, we incorporate a denoise and finetune strategy that denoises images rendered from NeRFs estimated by the hypernetwork and finetunes it while retaining multiview consistency. These improvements enable us to use HyP-NeRF as a generalizable prior for multiple downstream tasks including NeRF reconstruction from single-view or cluttered scenes and text-to-NeRF. We provide qualitative comparisons and evaluate HyP-NeRF on three tasks: generalization, compression, and retrieval, demonstrating our state-of-the-art results. 
    more » « less
  3. Recent advances in Neural Radiance Field (NeRF)-based methods have enabled high-fidelity novel view synthesis for video with dynamic elements. However, these methods often require expensive hardware, take days to process a second-long video and do not scale well to longer videos. We create an end-to-end pipeline for creating dynamic 3D video from a monocular video that can be run on consumer hardware in minutes per second of footage, not days. Our pipeline handles the estimation of the camera parameters, depth maps, 3D reconstruction of dynamic foreground and static background elements, and the rendering of the 3D video on a computer or VR headset. We use a state-of-the-art visual transformer model to estimate depth maps which we use to scale COLMAP poses and enable RGB-D fusion with estimated depth data. In our preliminary experiments, we rendered the output in a VR headset and visually compared the method against ground-truth datasets and state-of-the-art NeRF-based methods. 
    more » « less
  4. Neural networks can represent and accurately reconstruct radiance fields for static 3D scenes (e.g., NeRF). Several works extend these to dynamic scenes captured with monocular video, with promising performance. However, the monocular setting is known to be an under-constrained problem, and so methods rely on data-driven priors for reconstructing dynamic content. We replace these priors with measurements from a time-of-flight (ToF) camera, and introduce a neural representation based on an image formation model for continuous-wave ToF cameras. Instead of working with processed depth maps, we model the raw ToF sensor measurements to improve reconstruction quality and avoid issues with low reflectance regions, multi-path interference, and a sensor's limited unambiguous depth range. We show that this approach improves robustness of dynamic scene reconstruction to erroneous calibration and large motions, and discuss the benefits and limitations of integrating RGB+ToF sensors that are now available on modern smartphones. 
    more » « less
  5. Neural networks can represent and accurately reconstruct radiance fields for static 3D scenes (e.g., NeRF). Several works extend these to dynamic scenes captured with monocular video, with promising performance. However, the monocular setting is known to be an under-constrained problem, and so methods rely on data-driven priors for reconstructing dynamic content. We replace these priors with measurements from a time-of-flight (ToF) camera, and introduce a neural representation based on an image formation model for continuous-wave ToF cameras. Instead of working with processed depth maps, we model the raw ToF sensor measurements to improve reconstruction quality and avoid issues with low reflectance regions, multi-path interference, and a sensor's limited unambiguous depth range. We show that this approach improves robustness of dynamic scene reconstruction to erroneous calibration and large motions, and discuss the benefits and limitations of integrating RGB+ToF sensors now available on modern smartphones. 
    more » « less