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Title: Spatial Control of Substitutional Dopants in Hexagonal Monolayer WS 2 : The Effect of Edge Termination
Abstract

The ability to control the density and spatial distribution of substitutional dopants in semiconductors is crucial for achieving desired physicochemical properties. Substitutional doping with adjustable doping levels has been previously demonstrated in 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs); however, the spatial control of dopant distribution remains an open field. In this work, edge termination is demonstrated as an important characteristic of 2D TMD monocrystals that affects the distribution of substitutional dopants. Particularly, in chemical vapor deposition (CVD)‐grown monolayer WS2, it is found that a higher density of transition metal dopants is always incorporated in sulfur‐terminated domains when compared to tungsten‐terminated domains. Two representative examples demonstrate this spatial distribution control, including hexagonal iron‐ and vanadium‐doped WS2monolayers. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are further performed, indicating that the edge‐dependent dopant distribution is due to a strong binding of tungsten atoms at tungsten‐zigzag edges, resulting in the formation of open sites at sulfur‐zigzag edges that enable preferential dopant incorporation. Based on these results, it is envisioned that edge termination in crystalline TMD monolayers can be utilized as a novel and effective knob for engineering the spatial distribution of substitutional dopants, leading to in‐plane hetero‐/multi‐junctions that display fascinating electronic, optoelectronic, and magnetic properties.

 
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Award ID(s):
2011839
NSF-PAR ID:
10396034
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Small
Volume:
19
Issue:
6
ISSN:
1613-6810
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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