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Title: The neurocognition of engineering students designing: A preliminary study exploring problem framing and the use of concept mapping
The purpose of the research presented in this poster was to measure the change in neurocognitive processing that occurs from concept mapping in students’ brains. The research question is what are the effects of concept mapping on students’ neurocognition when developing design problem statements? We explored changes in students’ prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC is the neural basis of working memory and higher order cognitive processing, such as sustained attention, reasoning, and evaluations. Specific regions of interest in the PFC are illustrated.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1929896
NSF-PAR ID:
10399188
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Editor(s):
ASEE
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ASEE Annual Conference 2022
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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