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Title: The Role of Low-Level Flow Direction on Tropical Cyclone Intensity Changes in a Moderate-Sheared Environment
Abstract

The impact of low-level flow (LLF) direction on the intensification of intense tropical cyclones under moderate deep-layer shear is investigated based on idealized numerical experiments. The background flow profiles are constructed by varying the LLF direction with the same moderate deep-layer shear. When the maximum surface wind speed of the simulation without background flow reaches 70 kt (36 m s−1), the background flow profiles are imposed. After a weakening period in the first 12 h, the members with upshear-left-pointing LLF (fast-intensifying group) intensify faster between 12 and 24 h than those members (slow-intensifying group) with downshear-right-pointing LLF. The fast-intensifying group experiences earlier development of inner-core structures after 12 h, such as potential vorticity below the midtroposphere, upper-level warm core, eyewall axisymmetrization, and radial moist entropy gradient, while the inner-core features of the slow-intensifying group remain relatively weak and asymmetric. The FI group experiences smaller tilt increase and stronger midlevel PV ring development. The upshear-left convection during 6–12 h is responsible for the earlier development of the inner core by reducing ventilation, providing axisymmetric heating, and benefiting the eyewall development. The LLF of the fast-intensifying group enhances surface heat fluxes in the downshear side, resulting in higher energy supply to the upshear-left convection from the boundary layer. In all, this study provides new insights on the impact of LLF direction on intense storms under moderate shear by modulating the surface heat fluxes and eyewall convection.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10403734
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
American Meteorological Society
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Volume:
78
Issue:
9
ISSN:
0022-4928
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 2859-2877
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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